It’s Cold, but I Smell Good

We haven’t had quite the frozen-tundra effect that some of the rest of the country has had recently (Facebook friends were posting about their under-zero temperatures), but it’s been pretty cold over the past couple of days, getting down to single digits at night… with WIND, giving us a wind chill factor of below zero. Brrrr.

Aren't these gorgeous?
Aren’t these gorgeous?

I’ve been fighting the cold with white florals – looks like my January tuberose/white floral obsession has rolled back around again. I’ve been wearing the following:

Houbigant Orangers en Fleurs. This is a very floral orange blossom with jasmine; a bit soapy but not overly so, as many many orange-blossom fragrances go on my skin. There may be a bit of tuberose in here too.

Robert Piguet Fracas. Not for nothing is Fracas the Queeeeeeeeen – she’s a movie star in cream satin and diamonds, with a dressing room jam-packed with bouquets, and a dressing table littered with cosmetics of every kind, lipsticks and face powders and mascara and beauty patches and eye shadows and kohls and blushers and cold cream. Enormous, and exaggerated to the point of artificiality, but beautiful. This is not, to my mind, “a tuberose perfume.” It’s a mixed white floral in which tuberose and orange blossom share the billing.

Le Galion Tubereuse (2014 rerelease). According to Grain de Musc, the original 1939 version of this tuberose soliflore predated Fracas, and reportedly influenced its creation – though I don’t see a lot of relationship between the two, honestly.  This one is very green and fresh – Fragrantica lists several fruity notes in the rereleased version, fruity notes I don’t get at all. It also lists orange blossom, but pretty much all I get from the Le Galion is tuberose and green leaves.

ByRedo Flowerhead. Tuberose, jasmine, and rose, with some bitterish stuff up top that mimics the delightfully pungent smell of marigold (though reportedly marigold, an important component of the Indian brides’ headdresses that Flowerhead refers to, was too difficult to add to the composition). I was wearing this for the first time when Hayley-dog died, so I’d been reluctant to wear it again, but it is very beautiful.

Tom Ford Black Orchid Voile de Fleur. Sadly discontinued, this gentler version of the polarizing original (I can’t stand Black Orchid; the florals are completely overwhelmed with a cucumber/dirt thing that smells like dank basements) is heavy on tuberose and ylang, with a milky, peppery veil. I’d like to smell Velvet Orchid, the newest flanker to Black Orchid.

If I hadn’t used  up my sample of Serge Lutens Fleurs d’Oranger – the newer stuff, less packed with cumin than the first version released – I’d be wearing that too, as it’s just as much tuberose and jasmine as orange blossom, and very lovely.

I once looked into getting fresh tuberose stems at the local florist. They were available – by special order, $75 minimum. Wonder if I could force the bulbs, and if so where I could get some…

Anybody else craving white florals in the cold?

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Top Ten for Winter 2012

Astro Blasters Top Ten

My Top Ten lists are always changing, but here’s the current list of things I find good for winter weather:

1. Teo Cabanel Alahine.  There was never any doubt, was there?  This floral amber says, “Madrigal Dinner” to me in the best possible way.  It’s golden and happy.

2. Frederic Malle Editions de Parfums Carnal Flower.  Carnal Flower is stunning at any time of year, a juicy tuberose-jasmine halo with an florist-case-fresh green top.  Cold weather highlights that icy, minty green opening and makes me glad I’m alive.

3. Givenchy Organza Indecence.  A cozy woody vanilla scent with an orange-spice angle, it feels like that warm sunny spot on the back of the couch that the cat occupies.

4. Guerlain Shalimar Light.  Lemon custard with a drop of jasmine, just the sort of thing to help you weather a blustery chilly night.  A comforter fragrance. Continue reading Top Ten for Winter 2012

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