Scent Diary, Dec. 25-31, 2017

Monday, Dec. 25: Merry Christmas! I hope you had a lovely day, if you celebrate.

Beautiful original Alahine today for a lovely day with the family. Bacon and homemade cinnamon rolls and my mom’s delicious scalloped apples for breakfast. Stockings and gifts, lovely surprises.

We went to see Star Wars: The Last Jedi as a family in the afternoon and then spent a good bit of time talking about it. No spoilers, but we felt that we could have written a considerably better script.

Tuesday, Dec. 26: Another nice (if chilly) day, spent with The CEO’s family. I had recently cleaned out a closet and found a few samples in a box, along with a Travalo atomizer, full but unlabeled. I’m not absolutely sure what’s in it, but I think it’s Prada Infusion d’Iris. Which Bookworm once misread and called “Infection of Iris,” and from there it morphed into “Infectional Virus,” which might be juvenile and crass but it makes us laugh. That was my SOTD. It’s funny, but there are a fair number of perfumistas who consider Id’I (Infectional Virus, wink wink) the gold standard for wearing to a dentist visit. Apparently we tend to find it inoffensive, pleasant and calming.

Vintage Samsara parfum in the evening, for coziness.

Wednesday, Dec. 27: The CEO, along with Gaze and his first cousin Curiosity, and Curiosity’s dad K (who was The CEO’s roommate at Virginia Tech, way back in the day, before he married The CEO’s sister E), went to a basketball game at VT before they delivered his sister J to the airport and went home themselves. Bookworm and Taz and I rested and cleaned up a bit. I’ve made three giant vats of spiced cider this week, and the third batch is almost gone already. SOTD was Parfumerie Generale Un Crime Exotique from an old sample. This one is really nice, a pleasant spicy woody vanilla; I was surprised to find out that it’s been discontinued. Huh.

The general talk about PG in comments on Now Smell This is that Pierre Guillaume is perhaps too expansive with his product line, both with the original Parfumerie Generale and the more boutiquey Huitieme Art house. Then, too, as far as I understand, he is also the perfumer for Phaedon Perfumery; I’m not sure whether he’s materially involved in owning Phaedon or not. The perfumista complaint is that he seems to always be promoting the new-New-NEW stuff and ignoring the marketing of the original products, to the detriment of sales. PG himself does come off looking a bit vain (go check out his Facebook page, which despite being designed as a public figure/business type page has a fairly large number of pics of him posing like a model). I don’t know. I do know that Un Crime Exotique was really good and I am wishing I had a small decant of it. I liked Felanilla, too. Have not smelled any of the more recent PG fragrances, nor any Huitieme Art nor any Phaedon.

Shrug. So many MANY fragrances, so little time. (So few available to me to smell for free, as well.)

Thursday, Dec. 28: SOTD was Lolita Lempicka Eau de Minuit. A writing day/cleaning up day — though we won’t really dismantle the Christmas decor until New Year’s. It is COLDDDD.

Friday, Dec. 29: Took Thorin (the Sorento) to have his oil changed and the slow leak in his rear passenger tire repaired, and it took so long that after that and swinging by the grocery store, there was practically no time to do much else. Virginia Tech lost its bowl game, unaccountably. Of the numerous VT sports writers around here, nobody seems to understand exactly why it was so unsuccessful against Oklahoma State.

In the evening, we decided that we would get up early and drive to Richmond to see the Terracotta Army exhibit at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. I’d visited that museum once before, with my sister. She did her best to explain modern art to me, but I suppose I am a philistine. So much of it I just don’t get. Quite often I’m looking at it and thinking, “Um, so? What exactly about this is art? What am I supposed to be thinking or feeling? Because I’m thinking, ‘my preschooler did something remarkably similar to this,’ and ‘this is basically A Colored Rectangle and I have no feelings about it one way or another.'” Sometimes the sculpture has an impact on me and I enjoy it, but a lot of the 2D stuff, nah.

But the terracotta army? Fascinating! I will be posting a separate article on it, with The CEO’s pictures, in a few days.

After the art museum we visited Virginia’s historic and beautiful state house. The last time I’d been there was ca. 1978, when I was a fourth-grader on a field trip, and it was exciting to see the new entrance to the building, constructed under the hill in 2007. I could spend a lot of time talking about this building, which is the second oldest state house or state capitol building in the US (behind Maryland, although Virginia’s state legislature is the oldest body continuously in existence, because the Virginia legislature moved its location from Jamestown to Williamsburg and only then to Richmond). It was designed by Thomas Jefferson and would look quite familiar to many Americans because of its similarity to much of the architecture of federal buildings in Washington, D.C., and indeed to many government buildings throughout the United States. It does contain an interior dome not visible from the outside, but maintains a clean and simple exterior roofline.

Thing is, the Virginia State Capitol was conceived and its cornerstone laid in 1795, five years before Washington, D.C. even existed, much less before a building was constructed inside the new capital city. Neoclassicism as used in American governmental buildings really began with Jefferson’s architecture based on ancient Roman temple Maison CarrĂ©e in Nimes, France. The Virginia General Assembly still meets in this building, albeit in wings built in 1904.

This building also houses the only statue of George Washington created from life studies, by French sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon. (More than two dozen bronze copies of this statue exist in various places, including the Washington Monument, so undoubtedly you’ve seen one of those — but this one in glowy Carrara marble the color of moonlight is the original.)

We got home late but glad we took the opportunity to go.

Sunday, Dec. 31: L’Arte di Gucci for this quiet day at home. The CEO built a fire and edited his photos of the terracotta army, and we cleaned up before spending the evening together.

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